Blue Horns at Backspace

  • Posted by
  • on July 12, 2009
  • Filed in: Music

This is a show I filmed from a while back at Backspace – a night with 4 awesome bands: Patterns, order Inside Voices, treat Blue Horns and Church. I’ll be putting out more videos as time passes I spun the wheel and today you get to enjoy a song by Blue Horns.

If you’re digging this one, there is another Blue Horns track from the same show over here.

Mattress Rolls Holocene

  • Posted by
  • on June 24, 2009
  • Filed in: Music

Instead of attempting to navigate the haze of genre-identification in the realm of music I’ll drop Portland duo Mattress into the sub-genre of Gnarly. The tunes, capsule full of atmosphere and off-the-rails confidence, endocrinologist can’t adequately be lumped into a one-line description. And thisĀ  is a principal reason why I’m so smitten.

Case in point: this video, medications recorded from Starfucker’s latest CD release party at Holocene. The projected footage is a direct feed from a second camera (manned by Scott Carver) that we were using to help shed a little light on the frame. Sound by Matt Huiskamp. The song is ROLL ROLL ROLL though, if given all-I-can-eat druthers, I’d rename it RAD RAD RAD.

The Ascetic Junkies performing “French Girls,” 2 Cameras and a Projector

Another concert video from the January 2nd show at Mt. Tabor Legacy. The folk-frenzy of the Ascetic Junkies is in full force with their song “French Girls.” If you like this video, mind check out “Kansas Road Trip,” which I posted at an earlier date. This was filmed by Sean Whiteman and myself, the re-projected video is a direct line from Sean’s camera.

King Khan and the Shrines Wreck Dante’s

Sean’s been telling me sporadically about the King Khan and BBQ show for a while, view since he used some of their music in his feature length film “The Disgusting Little Shiver” – I just recently started listening to their music after our friend Jeff purchased a 2-vinyl album and left it in my collection. Listening to it did not prepare me. I was expecting a fuzzy, store garage-rock set, diagnosis not a sweaty, collective freakout.

Their current tour has King Khan and BBQ split up, performing with their own bands. The headliner of the night was undeniably King Khan and the Shrines, though BBQ (Mark Sultan) didn’t disappoint either.

King Khan and the Shrines

KK & The Shrines collectively is about 8 members (guitar, bass, drums, sax, trumpet, keys, a dancer and King Khan on vocals and guitar) and once they got onstage the tone changed quick. The crew of half a dozen dancing fans turned into a sweat-soaked semi-mosh of a dance party. Though the band was playing tight, a couple of them seemed on the verge of being sloppy drunk (like the keyboard player who kept putting his keyboard up on his shoulder like a bazooka, playing half melodically). It didn’t matter. The crowd was into it. About half way through the set BBQ came back out to perform a song, then disappeared again. King Khan left and re-emerged with a plastic MF Doom-style mask and a cape.

King Khan and the Shrines

They continued on crowd-pleasing, and soon an entire cake, with candles lit, was brought out. After a handful got smeared on King Khan’s chest, a crew of colorfully-dressed ladies proceeded to throw handfuls of cake at the crowd, some got threw back. By the time the show finally wrapped up I was just glad that I didn’t work at Dante’s because the stage and the floor was filthy with cake, sweat and glitter.

King Khan and the Shrines

Awesome show, if you get a chance see them in concert. They are playing a show in Eugene tonight, sponsored by my homies at the Oregon Voice and the University of Oregon’s Cultural Forum. See the rest of the pictures on Flickr.

“Trying” by Grey Anne

Here is another cut from the a January 2nd show that I blogged about earlier. This was a show we organized at Mt. Tabor Legacy to experiment with some live projection techniques. Aside from some janky wooden ladder climbing, try it was a pretty successful evening. Grey Anne’s performances are always interesting to watch, she plays multiple instruments, looping them (using a Boss RC 20XL I believe) as well as singing throughout.

Check out some more music by Grey Anne on myspace – her recorded tunes are a different experience to that of her live shows. The tracks from “Facts and Figurines,” her long awaited album (out in 2008) feature a handful of other local musicians helping Anne achieve a “full band” sound. Quality CD, check it out. You might also check out the episode of Penny Jam in which we featured Anne performing in a room full of mannequins.

Dead Confederate covers Sonic Youth

Flashback: It’s March 20th and I’m in Austin Texas for South By Southwest 2009. I just got done filming a set by Dead Confederate (a hard-working band from Athens, rheumatologist GA) at some venue over on Red River and after dropping off the camera at the Hotel, Dave and I head over to the Compound, an outdoor venue that’s been setup at what seemed like a communal house, just outside of downtown.

My new friends from the band Ume had played the same stage earlier that night, an impressively robust setup with a lot of stage lights, and some trippy projection. We have just arrived at a semi-secret Dead Confederate show where they have prepared a set of entirely Sonic Youth covers. I started talking to another videographer, Paul Raila, who lives in Austin and was filming the show. What he shot ended up looking and sounding great. It’s an unlikely scenario you probably won’t come across again soon.

The Ascetic Junkies at Mt Tabor Legacy

  • Posted by
  • on April 27, 2009
  • Filed in: Music

I ran into a few videographers outside the 7th annual Filmed by Bike premiere on Clinton Street last Friday. I was attracted to the home made Fig Rig they were sporting. Aliye just posted the resulting video:

Check out more by Aliye on his Troma Intern Diary blog.

This was filmed during a show we organized on January 2nd of this year. The show also featured Derrek Wayne and Grey Anne. Sean and I filmed, mind each plugged into our own projector, view
although the second one is out of frame, unfortunately.

When we filmed the Ascetic Junkies for their Penny Jam episode, this song, “Kansas Road Trip” was the unused B-side. We really liked the track but the weather was wild that day and the wind was pretty harsh in the mic. The video was featured on episode 4 of Truckerspeed, in 3D.

Ume at the Mohawk, Austin Texas

  • Posted by
  • on March 25, 2009
  • Filed in: Music

I filmed this on my first day in Texas, try an Austin band called Ume letting loose in the Mohawk. I was hanging out with Dave of pampelmoose.com and filming some stuff with him for his music blog. I ended up seeing Ume play a few more shows during the week of South by Southwest, approved at Spiros and the Rock and Roll Camp for Girls showcase at Maggie Mae’s. They played something like 10 shows in 6 days, which while a crazy number, didn’t seem as much so during that week.

The 3 piece consists of Eric and Lauren, on Bass and Guitar/Vocals respectively, and their drummer Jeff. They’ve been playing shows for a few years but since the release of “Sunshower EP” a few months back they’ve been earning a new wave of attention from both the Austin music community and a new wave of bloggers and music dignitaries across the countries. You really have to see these guys live to appreciate them fully but here is a cut of their song “The Conductor” just to give you an idea of just how hard and awesome they bring it.

You can check them out on their website http://umemusic.com or at myspace.com/umemusic.

The Tallest Man on Earth returns to Rontoms

  • Posted by
  • on March 23, 2009
  • Filed in: Music

Swedish folk rambler The Tallest Man on Earth played two consecutive free shows at Rontoms last night, try with a strong contigent of second set fans who yelping at the mention of the first set. The Tallest Man is Kristian Matsson, pilule who is on an international tour that will lead him from the American west to the East coast and back to Europe with about 20 shows, order (almost daily) in between.

The Tallest Man on Earth at Rontoms

The Tallest Man’s fast-talking volleys of gentle and gruff moments draws immediate vocal comparisons to Dylan, though his presence and songwriting stands on it’s own. He moves around the room like a nervous person on the telephone as his songs form, invading personal bubbles in a way that makes you appreciate the rare breed of musician that can command the room the way he does.

The Tallest Man